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Stress Relief Practicum

Connect with others who are seeking healthy ways to handle stress.

Learn new skills and tools to manage stress and take care of yourself.

Wednesdays beginning
March 25th –April 22nd from 5-6PM
Meetings will follow an exploratory workshop format and participants will learn and practice different stress relief techniques each week.

Contact Tanya Purdy, MPH MCHES Director of Health Education
for more information or to sign up.
Reference “Stress Relief Practicum” in the subject line.

Sign up by Friday, March 20th.
Space is limited and on a first reply basis.
Participants will be expected to attend all 5 sessions.

We Speak, We Stand

Dear ’15,

Please see information about this training here: we speak we stand bystander intervention training flyer_spring 2015

Best,

DW

 

Africanizing Technology Conference Program

Thursday, March 5th
Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, Room 311
222 Church Street, Middletown, CT

5:00pm Keynote Lecture: Julie Livingston (Rutgers University)
“Pharmaceutical Technologies and the Nature of Efficacy in Botswana”

Friday, March 6th
Conference Panels
Usdan University Center, Room 110
45 Wyllys Avenue, Middletown, CT

9:00am Panel I: Technologies of Identity and Knowledge Production
Drew Thompson, Bard College
“Disputes over the Past: The biometric passport and studio photography in Mozambique, 1980-Recent Times”

Crystal Biruk, Oberlin College
“Standards and ‘gifts': Soap as improvisational technology in Malawian survey research worlds”

Summer Wood, New York University
“Technologies of Identity in Tanzania”

Panel Chair: Jennifer Tucker, Wesleyan University

10:45am Panel II: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Development

Susan P. Wyche, Michigan State University
“‘If God Gives Me the Chance I will Design my Own Phone': Rural Kenyan Repairers and Reimagining Mobile Phone Design”

Sean Jacobs, The New School and “Africa is a Country” Blog
“Shifting African Digital Landscapes”

Gloria Emeagwali, Connecticut State University
“Interconnections between female entrepreneurship and technological innovation in the Nigerian Context”

Solen Feyissa, University of Minnesota
“Contextualizing Educational Uses of Information Communication Technologies inside and outside of Ethiopian Classrooms”

Panel Chair: Mike Nelson, Wesleyan University

1:45pm Panel III: Imagining New Technological Cultures

Laura Ann Twagira, Wesleyan University
“Becoming Master’s of Nature: Women’s Transformation of a Colonial Irrigation Project in French
West Africa”

Joshua Grace, University of South Carolina
“Tinkering, Techne, and Cars: The Africanization of a Hindi-named European Technology”

Mahriana Rofheart, Georgia Gwinnett College
“Fictional Technologies of Collaboration”

Jennifer Hart, Wayne State University
“Of Mammy Trucks and Men: African Automobility and the Politics of Development in Colonial
Ghana”

Panel Chair: Heidi Gengenbach, University of Massachusetts Boston

3:15pm Coffee Break

3:30pm Panel IV: Technological Cultures of Health and Healing

Anne Pollock, Georgia Tech
“Africanizing synthetic chemistry?: Hope in Drug Discovery ‘by and for’ Africa”

Donna Patterson, Wellesley College
“Pharmacy, Biomedicine, and Gender in Senegal”

Tara Dosumu Diener, University of Michigan
“Practice Makes Perfect: Signal, Noise, and Clinical Imagination in the Maternity Ward”

Sarah Hardin, St. Anselm College
“Modern Potions: The Social and Health Repercussions of Pesticides in Senegal and the
Francophone World”

Panel Chair: Paul Erickson, Wesleyan University

5:30pm Closing Discussion

For more information please see the conference website:

africanizingtechnology.conference.wesleyan.edu

Or, contact the conference organizer Prof. Laura Ann Twagira (ltwagira@wesleyan.edu)

Africanizing Technology is supported by the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, The Richard and May Scott Charitable Trust, the Department of History, and the Science in Society Program at Wesleyan University.

All Student Workshop and Dinner: Contemplative Practice
February 19 6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
with Professor Michelle Francl, Rabbi David Teva and Rev. Tracy Mehr-Muska
Downey House Lounge, 294 High Street
RSVP: dleipziger@wesleyan.edu
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All Faculty and Graduate Student Workshop on Contemplative Pedagogy
“Practically impractical: Contemplative practices in the classroom”
Thursday February 19 10-11:30 AM
Albritton Center, Room 311, 222 Church Street
Workshop Leader: Professor Michelle Francl
Academic Technology Roundtable (ATR) lunch after the workshop.
RSVP (workshop and/or lunch) CFCD@wesleyan.edu
Questions? Please contact Jan Naegele X3232

http://www.wesleyan.edu/cfcd/

Pedagogy Workshop Description: In a world that is hyperconnected and hyperkinetic, how do we help our students, and ourselves, thread a path through an every growing body of information. What practices can we find that might enable us to bring a clear and sustained focus to our work in the classroom and the laboratory? This workshop considers how one might approach teaching from a contemplative perspective, in both the long and short term, as both an overarching stance and in a class here and there. We will experiment with the adaptation of several traditional contemplative practices to classroom situations including “stilling” (breath and body awareness), contemplative writing, “beholding.” and explore how these might be instantiated in a classroom, laboratory or personal practice.

Workshop leader Bio:
Michelle M. Francl is Professor of Chemistry on the Clowes Fund in Science and Public Policy at Bryn Mawr College, where she has been on the faculty since 1986. She is a quantum chemist who has published in areas ranging from the development of methods for computational chemistry to the structures of topologically intriguing molecules.

Michelle teaches writing and chemistry and takes a contemplative approach to both, introducing students to practices to help them find stillness and focus, including contemplative writing, beholding and lectio divina. She feels strongly that a pedagogical stance that recognizes the role contemplation plays in research and writing — scientific or otherwise — has the potential to deepen students engagement in their work.

Michelle is also a writer whose essays on science, culture and policy regularly appear in Nature Chemistry. Her column, Catholic Spirituality, can be found at the Philadelphia Archdiocese’s news site, CatholicPhilly.com, and her reflections on living a contemplative life in the midst of the everyday chaos appear in a number of print and online venues. She gives workshops on writing for scientists, the occasional retreat and blogs about science at The Culture of Chemistry and the rest of life at Quantum Theology.

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Janina Montero Prize

Janina Montero Prize: Open to all Latino(a) Seniors!!

This prize is given each year by the Wesleyan Latino Alumni Council and Janina Montero to an outstanding Latino senior who have demonstrated academic excellence and who has been involved in the Latino community and in the Wesleyan community at large.

The individual should exemplify personal integrity, leadership, and motivation; a strong interest in and knowledge of his/her background; and have maintained a high level of commitment to Wesleyan’s academic and intellectual enterprise.

Submit one copy of a current resume, copy of academic history, and one-page statement of academic accomplishments including contributions to the Latina(o), Student of Color and Wesleyan communities.

This material must be submitted to Dr. Marina Melendez, Class Dean for 2018, 237 North College, 2nd Floor, Room 215, no later than 5:00PM on Tuesday, March 24, 2015. No application will be accepted after the deadline.

Please feel free to contact Dean Melendez via email or at 860.685.2765 if there are any questions.

The Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, with the support of the Center for Community Partnerships, the Office of Equity and Inclusion, and the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development, is sponsoring a free showing of Selma, followed by a short talk by Ben Jackson, a veteran of the Selma demonstrations, and a discussion of the film led by members of The Ankh.

Monday, February 9, 7:45, at Metro Theaters downtown.
Tickets are free but required.
They are available from Sara Wadlow, Allbritton 116, 3-5 on Wednesday, 9-5 on Thursday, 9-1 on Friday, and 9-5 on Monday.
Tickets are extremely limited: first come, first served.

Thursday, February 19, 12-noon, PAC 002:
History Matters…Careers: “From History Major to Arts Center Director”
Pamela Tatge ‘84 P’16, Wesleyan’s Director of the Center for the Arts, reflects on the role her history major and her Wesleyan education played in her personal and professional path.

The first blood drive of the semester will be held tomorrow, Tuesday, February 3rd, and Wednesday, February 4th from 11:45am-5pm in Beckham Hall.

All donors will receive a $5 Dunkin Donuts gift card, a free Red Cross T-shirt, and best of all they will be saving lives.

To make an appointment people can email me at sdiazroa@wesleyan.edu or they can sign up at http://www.redcrossblood.org/make-donation

Fun Facts about blood donation:
Someone needs blood every two seconds.
One pint of blood (one donation) can save up to three lives.
About 1 in 7 people entering a hospital need blood.
More than 4.5 million patients need blood transfusions each year in the U.S. and Canada.
If only one more percent of all Americans would give blood, blood shortages would disappear for the foreseeable future.

Religion Faith and Queer Identity Flyer

The SuitUP Program

Announcing the SuitUP program

Recognizing that some students may need financial support to purchase business attire to interview for jobs or internships, the SuitUP Program was initiated in 2014 by the Career Center to provide eligible students with a $200 grant for that purpose. Current undergraduate students in good standing who are receiving need-based financial aid at the time they apply, are eligible for the grant. The application requests information on the student’s career goals and their plans to pursue experiences where business attire will be needed. Funds are limited and will be distributed until the pool is emptied.

Please contact Persephone Hall at phall@wesleyan.edu for an application and more information about the SuitUp program.

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